While typography may look simple at first glance, it is actually deceptively tricky. The plain, toned-down nature of typography makes it very hard for imperfections to hide anywhere. However, this is an easy fix because we, at Simplified have created the only guide you will need to understand, identify and use minimalist fonts in your design!

What are minimalist fonts?

Source: Original

Minimalism began around the 1950s and 60s, inspired by Bauhaus movement in architecture. At its core minimalism is about designers expressing the most essential characteristics of a product or subject.

Minimalist Fonts are clean, simple, and elegant typefaces that provide high readability. They are characterized by clean strokes and a minimal number of shapes. Below are some qualities that you should look for in a minimalist font:

  • Clean lines and crisp edges;
  • Very few geometric shapes withing the alphabets;
  • Whitespaces to give a modern and airy look;
  • Design details with significance or purpose;
  • Legibility: this means letters with large apertures and distinct shapes.

Related: Arial vs Helvetica: Which font is the the “Little Black Dress” of Graphic Design

Using Minimalist Fonts in Your Design

Minimal Fonts are modern typefaces that are efficient and forward-thinking. There is a great infographic by Crazy Egg that illustrates what feelings, emotions, and associations font types evoke.

There are simple tips—never use all caps and keep the number of fonts to a minimum—but a lot of formatting decisions rely on trial and error.

(Source: Toptal)

Grid Lover lets users customize type formatting for best readability. CSS is generated to the side, for easy implementation.

Related: Picking The Right Fonts For Your Website: Simplified Guide

Pairing Minimalist Fonts Like A Pro

Clean lines with sleek lettering. Rough edges and maybe some brush strokes. Elegant and classy. Whatever aesthetic you’re aiming for, make sure you pick a font to match. Pair fonts that have some differentiators. Whether it’s thick and thin, tall and short, serif and sans serif. This will help create better hierarchies.

Tip #1:  Pair a romantic serif (header) with a modern minimalist font (sub-header), usually, sans serif. You can use small size serif + italic for the body text.

Source: Reux Design Co.

Tip #2: You can use the same minimalist font for header and sub-header but switch it up a little! You can keep the header uppercase and make the sub header italics. To make it look clean, use a minimalist sans serif font for the body.

Source: Reux Design Co.

Tip #3: Play with thickness within a minimalist font family. Pair a modern sans serif with a classic serif for the header + sub header. However, use a thinner version of the header font for the body text.

Source: Reux Design Co.

Tip #4: Similar to the aforementioned tip, play with thickness. For a modern minimalist design, use only sans serif fonts.

Source: Reux Design Co.

Famous Logos That Scream Minimalist Design

Bold, simple shapes, minimalist fonts and single color designs characterize minimal logos. They’re without the extra pizzaz and focus solely on the core design concept. These logos stand out even in the most crowded places and resonate your brand’s identity with your target audience. Below are some of the most iconic minimalist logo designs.

1. Uber

Uber’s wordmark logo is an amazing example of minimalist design. Unlike their contemporaries that use monograms or symbols, Uber opted for this clean, simplistic font. The logo was so iconic that the MCKL Type family is now synonymous with the brand.

2. Airbnb

On the company’s 10th anniversary, Airbnb rolled out its new logo with the minimalist font – Cereal. The rebrand to this new modern font was done keeping in mind the company’s personality. Cereal – a geometric sans serif, was designed with an overall roundness that feels friendly and approachable. (click the link for some fun)

3. Nike

To not include Nike in this list of minimalist design logos, is to err. The logo, also known as “Swoosh” was designed by a graphic student Carolyn Davidson in 1971. The swoosh was emblematic of the company name, that is, the winged Greek goddess of victory. The minimalist font appearing above the swoosh is italicized Impact, a sans serif typeface created by Geoffrey Ley in 1965.

Chrome Extensions to Identify Fonts

Owing to a myriad of font choices and their strikingly similar characteristics, it becomes difficult to distinguish between typefaces. That’s why we have created a list of chrome extensions you can use to identify fonts.

1. Fonts Ninja

Fonts Ninja has over 400k users and average rating of 4.4 out of 5. The free version of the extension helps you quickly identify fonts by hovering on the text. Furthermore, it provides a summary and preview of all the fonts and lets you bookmark them. This extension is our go-to for identifying that minimalist font we adore!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uiJAD5zhxrc

2. WhatFont

This font finder has over a million users on the Chrome Web Store and an average rating of 4.1 out of 5.

3. Font Finder

This extension is perfect for power users and web developers. This extension, similar to WhatFont, has over a million users and an average rating of 4.1 out of 5. It helps identify fonts quickly, not to mention, it’s uncanny ability to replace a type on a live web page with another for testing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGI3Atdzt64

4. WhatFontIs

If you are looking for an extension to find fonts within an image, WhatFontIs is your best bet. Agreed, it doesn’t give the most perfect match at all times, but it throws out loads of related fonts to help you identify the right one. WhatFontIs has over 10k users and average rating of 3.7 out of 5.

Download Your Favorite Minimalist Fonts for Free Here

  1. FontM
  2. DaFont
  3. Creative Market
  4. Behance
  5. Google Fonts
  6. Fontasy
  7. Neogrey

We hope this Simplified guide of minimalist fonts will help you pick the right typefaces for your next project. You can use Simplified’s default fonts or upload your own fonts to create a range of graphics!

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